Elizabeth Scripturient (the delinquent, ecumenical (hermionesviolin) wrote,
Elizabeth Scripturient (the delinquent, ecumenical
hermionesviolin

[back to school] course selection

I was reminded today that the Harvard Extension School catalog is up (it's one the emails I got while I was away, and when catching up on Friday I shunted it aside).

I can has Intro Econ!

ECON E-10a Principles of Economics - Fall term (10062)
Siddiq M. Abdullah, PhD, Professor of Management, Pine Manor College.
Tuesdays beginning Sept. 16, 7:35-9:35 pm, Harvard Hall, Room 201.
The course deals with basic economic principles that help us understand the process of decision making by individuals and societies. We analyze the fundamental economic activities of production, distribution, exchange, and consumption at both the micro and macro level. Besides developing an understanding of the functioning of a free market system, we also critically examine the controversies that surround the use of public policies for the greater common good.


I was considering taking HIST E-1915 Africa and Africans: The Making of a Continent in the Modern World (12991)
Caroline Elkins, PhD, Hugo K. Foster Associate Professor of African Studies, Harvard University.
Online only, beginning Sept.15.
Understanding Africa as it exists today requires an understanding of the broader historical trends that have dominated the continent's past. This course provides a historical context for understanding issues and problems as they exist in contemporary Africa. It offers an integrated interpretation of sub-Saharan African history from the middle of the nineteenth century and the dawn of formal colonial rule through the period of independence until the present time. Particular emphasis is given to the continent's major historical themes during this period. Selected case studies are offered from throughout the continent to provide illustrative examples of the historical trends.
but I think I'm gonna be lame and just read the texts on the syllabi (admittedly that means no coursepacket for me) and actually enroll in RELI E-1505 Religion, Education, and Democracy (13202)
Diane L. Moore, PhD, Professor of the Practice in Religious Studies and Education, Harvard Divinity School.
Fall term: Wednesdays beginning Sept. 17, 7:35-9:35 pm, Sever Hall, Room 203.
The focus of this course is to develop an understanding of the complex intersection between religion, secularism, democracy, and public education in multicultural America. Our exploration includes a historical review of the relationship between religion and public education in the US with special attention to pivotal Supreme Court decisions that have shaped public policy discourses in these areas over the past half century; a consideration of the social and moral consequences that stem from privileging secularism as the normative ideology of the public sphere; and a historical and contemporary analysis of differing views regarding the nature and purpose of public education and the role of religion in those debates.


ANTS has their courses up as well, and though there are very few distance learning courses to choose from, I'm stoked about the prospect of taking

THEO 637F
[EL] Process Theology

William Russell Pregeant
An exploration of the basic concepts of the school of process theology that is grounded in the philosophical thought of Alfred North Whitehead and Charles Hartshorne. Specific attention is given to the interface of process theology with fields of contemporary interest such as feminist/womanist theologies, economics and politics, ecology, and world religions.
Syllabus
Fall - ELearning course

Except . . . seeking out their forms, registration was apparently Aug. 4-15. Le sigh.
Tags: ants, harvard: ext.: course: intro econ, harvard: ext.: course: rel ed democ, hbs: continuing ed
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