Elizabeth Scripturient (the delinquent, ecumenical (hermionesviolin) wrote,
Elizabeth Scripturient (the delinquent, ecumenical
hermionesviolin

I'm thinking last Iraq post for a while.

Over the weekend i started clearing out my e-mail and the result is a bunch of links re: Iraq for you all.

"Today's War Is Against Tomorrow's Iraq" by Philip Bobbitt

"The unexpectedly benign consequences of having delayed the conflict in Iraq: If George Bush's plans for the Middle East work, he will go down as one of the greatest Presidents, and as a benefactor of all mankind" by Bruce Anderson

Andrew Sullivan argues that Bush’s policy on Iraq isn’t all that different from Clinton’s.

The text of UN Resolution 1441

We heart James Lileks.

"Every permanent member of the U.N. Security Council has undertaken at least one war without the council's permission or endorsement."

"France plays the ‘Eisenhower card’" by Michael Moran

"As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free."


CONFESSIONS OF A WEARY WAR-BLOGGER: Over at GlennReynolds.com. But though my head is weary, it remains unbowed.
I have yet to make a definitive stand either way (because i’m all fun and conflicted like that), so i’m not sure how much the “unbowed” applies to me (though admittedly i haven’t bowed to peer pressure) but i think i still get to “thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul.”


Weariness and apprehension seem to be in the air.
I’m loving Steven Den Beste.


One day over the weekend i was thinking that i was starting to get convinced that war would really be a bad idea ("The Case Against a War With Iraq" - February 25, for instance, and then "Uncomfortable questions about U.S. policy toward Iraq" - March 6 has, near the end, some interesting things to say about the UN given that most anti-war people are all about the UN as a "serious security body."), and then the next day i was feeling like it was difficult for me to care.




More from Glenn Reynolds:
MAX BOOT WRITES that the United States should not let itself be tied down by "Lilliputians."

Personally, I think it's time that somebody tried appeasing us for a change.
My favorite is the final paragraph:
The UN isn't entirely useless. A quick perusal of its website shows that it has a lot to keep it busy. "UN agency to launch a new sports and environment initiative for youth," reads the headline of one press release. Another trumpets: "UN banks offer cut-rate loans for solar power development in India." While the UN pursues those weighty projects, the hard work of making the world a bit safer for democracy will be performed, as it always has been, and always will be, by America, Britain and their allies.


James Lileks wrote: "Chrissie Hynde of the Pretenders recently expressed in concert the hopes that our soldiers die and lose." And people wonder why war-protestors are accused of being anti-American. And yes, i know she’s representative of an extremist minority view. It’s just that as someone who is really not big with the killing at all, i find it so bad when someone basically says, “killing other people is bad, but because America sucks, we deserve to get killed.” I was big with the “let’s think about why some people hate us so much” after September 11th, but the Anti-Americanism definitely sometimes crosses a line in a serious way.

I think this is a really good article, but some of it definitely disturbs me about Pariser. I’m really tired of it being all about America, because i think it should be all about Iraq. I support this war because i think it will be good for the Iraqi people (i desperately hope we can do the post-war-rebuild well), and i hate that it has turned into (for many people) just another “America sucks, Bush sucks, etc.” The last paragraph disturbs me in a way i can’t quite articulate:
In the yellow room on West 57th Street, Pariser's bookcase is heavy with fiction that tends toward large, bleak visions: Orwell's ''1984,'' DeLillo's ''Underworld,'' David Foster Wallace's ''Infinite Jest.'' The literature seems out of tune with Pariser's optimism about democracy and his own temperament. Pariser says he read them to experience bleakness vicariously ''because my life was good. It was a way of kind of seeing what it's like to not be happy. There's a part of me that's drawn to kind of big stories, sort of epicness -- this sense of this sweeping narrative. If I want to get an instant adrenaline rush, that's the way that I do it -- thinking about my work now: this is huge, we've got so many people and there's such big stakes.''

This article gets really good starting around "One wonders what it would take for the Vatican to condemn Saddam's regime." I get the “war is bad,” thing, but i’m really tired of the fact that anti-war people don’t seem to acknowledge that Saddam is a horrible person who should not be in charge. Yes, i know it’s unfair to expect people to have all the answers. I know i would certainly be in trouble if every time i said “This is a bad way to do it,” i had to come up with a better way to do it, and everytime i start thinking like that i start thinking that maybe this really isn’t such a good idea, but then i think that i for one want Saddam gone and the Iraqi people to be able to govern themselves and i desperately hope we can do the post-war-rebuild well.


I’m tired of things being posted in communities where they don’t really belong, but this did remind me that i own a t-shirt which says “I Think Therefore I’m Dangerous” (with a picture of The Thinker of course) and i think i should start wearing it again. What i really need is one that says something like “I Think, Therefore I’m Conflicted,” or maybe “I Think, Therefore I Don’t Have a Definite Stance.”
Tags: issues: iraq war
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your IP address will be recorded 

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 0 comments