Elizabeth Scripturient (the delinquent, ecumenical (hermionesviolin) wrote,
Elizabeth Scripturient (the delinquent, ecumenical
hermionesviolin

"The media is not fooling me"?

I was thinking about how the conservatives think the liberals run the media and the liberals think the conservatives run the media. I’m beginning to think the liberals run the media but they’re not liberal enough for the liberals.

There’s also the interesting idea of just what constitutes the media. People keep talking about Michael Moore’s film showings us what the media wouldn’t, but those same people already hate Bush and many already knew most of the stuff Moore said/showed. So where did they get their information/opinions?

I guess there’s the idea of the “mainstream” media like the NYTimes and Newsweek/Time that one can safely assume gets read by most everyone, and then there’s what people choose to supplement based on their personal politics -- blogosphere, Indymedia.org/MoveOn.org, Mother Jones/Utne Reader, etc.. It’s funny, i can name lots of “progressive” magazines like Mother Jones or Third Wave stuff like Bust, but i don’t know which magazines lean Right. Is that part of how one considers something “mainstream,” i.e., if it is considered to be centrist/balanced/objective rather than having an obvious bias? Though i know there are plenty of magazines that are very upfront about their conservative/libertaria/right-of-center leanings, i just can’t name which ones those are off the top of my head.


Huh, after i wrote this, i read David Adesnik talking about the media backlash against Michael Moore and saying: “In my own discussions with journalists, I've found them to be at least as annoyed by leftists' accusations that they are conservative mouthpieces than by conservatives' accusations that they are inveterate liberals. So don't expected Moore's bumpy ride to end anytime soon.”

And then i read InstaPundit on a Yale study on media bias, which i found very interesting. To quote the Linda Seebach article: “Two researchers have combined these two disparate ideas to come up with a measure of media bias that doesn't depend on journalists' own perceptions of where they fit on the political spectrum, or on subjective judgments about the philosophical orientation of think tanks. Tim Groseclose, of UCLA and Stanford, and Jeff Milyo of the University of Chicago used data comparing which think tanks various politicians liked to quote and which think tanks various media outlets liked to quote in their news stories to estimate two ADA scores for each media outlet in the study, one based on the number of times a think tank was cited, and the other on the length of the citation.”
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